Are researchers building their h-index by plagiarizing work?

Posted by David Rothschild on Mar 29, 2012 4:55:00 PM

building research plagiarismThere are various means of measuring a researchers’s level of success in their field of expertise. Tallying the number of published papers is certainly one of them. Counting how many times each of those papers has been cited in credible journals is another. The problem with each of these methods is that, if you look at the cumulative totals of published works or citations, neither is really an accurate depiction of the quality of work being done by one individual or group. It was for that reason that the h-index, a formula that takes both of these factors into account, was developed.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




New Plagiarism Stories That Dig Up The Past

Posted by David Rothschild on Mar 16, 2012 4:34:00 PM

past plagiarismAs with most infractions – intentional plagiarism isn’t often a singular event.  If someone plagiarizes and gets away with it, they are very likely to do it again because no negative reinforcement has emerged to block their actions.  In fact, they are rewarded by their actions because they end up doing less work and getting all the credit for it.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Science Advisor to India’s Prime Minister Connected to Plagiarism

Posted by David Rothschild on Feb 28, 2012 3:51:00 PM

C.N.R. Rao science advisor indiaIn most industries, problems start at the highest corporate level and trickle downstream to the lower levels of a company. Corporate and legal regulations are purposefully enforced to prevent problems from going upstream – starting with a low level worker and then going on to affect management, executives and investors. These measures are in place so that a company’s organizational hierarchy doesn’t collapse at the drop of a dime.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Biggest Offender of Medical Research Misconduct in History?

Posted by David Rothschild on Feb 16, 2012 4:11:00 PM

medical research fraudResearch misconduct can cause damage in many ways. Institutions, publishers and patients can all be affected by the misconduct of a single researcher. A recent case that involves a researcher at Duke University could go down in history as one of the biggest medical research frauds ever.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Should all journalists be required to take a plagiarism quiz?

Posted by David Rothschild on Feb 10, 2012 3:51:00 PM

plagiarism quizThe Journal Register Company recently took on plagiarism at one of its Connecticut publications in a very unique way. After two incidents of plagiarism in a time span of three months, the editor of the Journal Register’s Connecticut papers, Matt DeRienzo, decided to utilize an evaluation technique employed in middle schools across the country: a pop quiz.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Self-Publishing Plagiarism: Amazon Kindle Pirated Books

Posted by David Rothschild on Jan 26, 2012 3:00:00 AM

220px Amazon Kindle 3You’d think that when you’re buying from a company as prestigious as Amazon that you could avoid plagiarism, but unfortunately, the theft of intellectual property and manuscripts rears its ugly head even in the most legitimate business circles. When buying reading material for your Kindle, you might be getting the real deal from a genuine author, or you could be getting a pirated version that someone else downloaded, copied, and repackaged.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Hungarian Community Calls for President’s Resignation, Citing Plagiarism

Posted by Jessica Gopalakrishnan on Jan 23, 2012 11:49:00 AM

220px Pál Schmitt (2011)Earlier this month Hungarian President Pal Schmitt was accused of plagiarizing his 1992 doctoral thesis. The controversary has heated up as several hundred demonstrators gathered on Saturday calling for his resignation, and claiming he is unfit to be in office.

According to HVG, 180 pages of Schmitt’s 215 page thesis was a "word-for-word translation" of a text written in French by Bulgarian sports historian and diplomat, Nikolai Georgiev (now deceased), who reportedly collaborated on research projects with Schmitt in the 1980s at Budapest Sports University.

President Pal Schmitt has rejected charges of plagiarism. According to Politics.hu, he said that “the paper had been based on primary data, using 21 source materials altogether... the basic material he drew on, some of which was also made use of by the Bulgarian Nikolay Georgiev, was not anyone’s intellectual property.”

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Red Wine Drinkers Beware - What You've Read May Not Be True

Posted by David Rothschild on Jan 18, 2012 11:10:00 PM

Red WineThe latest case of breaking misconduct news comes out of the University of Connecticut.  Dr. Dipak Das is the director of the UConn Health Center’s Cardiovascular Researcher Center, and is best known for his groundbreaking research on resveratrol, the chemical agent found in red wine that has been touted to benefit health in a number of ways.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




Best of 2011 Plagiarism Events

Posted by Jessica Gopalakrishnan on Dec 29, 2011 11:37:00 AM

best 2011 plagiarismLooking back at events that took place during the past year is one of favorite things to do. This year I am recounting a few of the best plagiarism events in 2011.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events




A Publisher’s Role in Defense of Plagiarism

Posted by David Rothschild on Dec 27, 2011 1:54:00 PM

Plagiarism DefenseThe relationship between authors and publishers has been rapidly evolving along with the digital age.  Many authors have taken to publishing their own books through large online e-book sellers like Amazon and distributing on platforms like the Kindle and iPad.  Not only do services like these provide streamlined publishing and distribution pathways, but they also offer authors a larger cut of profits than they would get with a traditional publisher.

Read More...

Tagged:  Current Events